Tomb Sweet Tomb
Editor's Rant
Staff and Contact
Letters
News
Merch
Band Interviews
Bella Morte
Belphegor
Chastain
CrashDiet 2
Glenn Danzig
Danzig
Death Becomes You
DeathStars
D.I.
ElectricHellfireClub
Lita Ford
G.B.H.
Genitorturers
Gwar 3
John 5
Kingdom Come
King Diamond
KISS
Lacuna Coil
Megadeth
Michael Monroe
Monster Magnet
Mortiis
Motörhead
Murderdolls
Nashville Pussy
The No. 13s
Obituary
Overkill
Paradise Lost
Prong 2
Marky Ramone
Satyricon
Seventh Void
Slayer
Society 1
Testament
Type O Negative
Eerie Von
Wednesday 13
Interview with...
Unearthly Sounds
Features
Concert Reviews
Media Reviews
Candids
Unearthed
Cryptgirls
The Library
The Vault
Deadly Links
Facebook
Twitter
Guestbook
 



by KK

Photos by: R.C. and Stephanie Cabral

Shawn Drover founded the Canadian power metal band EIDOLON and has now played drums (and also guitar) for MEGADETH for quite some time, from THE ARSENAL OF MEGADETH through their current release ENDGAME. He took a fast break from a soundcheck on the AMERICAN CARNAGE tour with Slayer and Anthrax to give CRYPT some fast Q&A:

KK: Yeah, I saw you guys play in Connecticut, it was awesome…how many dates have you had on this tour so far?

SD: Probably about twenty, I’d say, twenty-odd…it’s a four-week tour, so about 21-22 shows, around there…

KK: Are you still doing RUST IN PEACE every night, or no?

SD: Yep, we’re doin’ Rust In Peace for the rest of this leg, and then we continue when we do that in Australia, and that’ll take us to the end of the year, so it’s pretty much covered just about every territory playing Rust in Peace. That’s how it was set up this year, once we started playing it, everyone wanted to hear it, so we just kinda went with it…


KK: I was thinking, that could grind on you, playing it over and over, but it IS one of the best metal records that’s ever been made, too…

SD: I’ll tell you, it’s such a challenging record to play, but it’s also pretty rewarding, knowing when you walk offstage that you executed it well, it’s a great feeling knowing you pulled something like that off. So every night you gotta be on your toes, ‘cause it’s a tricky record.

KK: Now, you played on both United Abominations and Endgame, right?

SD: That’s right, yeah.

KK: So, how do you feel those two records stack up to each other?

SD: You know, all that stuff is subjective, in my opinion, y’know? No two Megadeth records sound the same, if you ask me. I really think United Abominations is a really strong record, and Endgame is a very strong record as well. To me, they’re good solid records, they have a good variety of different kinds of metal on there…certainly Endgame does, that’s for sure. It really covers the spectrum of styles within the metal realm. I’m proud of both records, definitely proud that I played on both of them, I think they’re both great.

KK: No offense, but I think Endgame stomps all over United Abominations, but it seems to me Dave (Mustaine) has his ‘target’ for each record, and for United Abominations it was the UN, and Endgame it’s FEMA. But Endgame just refers to that conspiracy in the song, it doesn’t mean Megadeth’s closing up shop, right?

SD: Absolutely not.


KK: I’d hoped not. So do you have plans for the next record yet?

SD: Yeah, we’re certainly talking about it. Right now we’re in tour mode, but we’re starting to discuss our game plan for next year, and I envision next year we’ll be recording a new record. So there’s no end in sight as far as we’re concerned. We’re just going to keep rolling, and things are going really well for us right now, and we’re just seizing every opportunity that we can.

KK: Right, now the “Big Four” show you did (SONISPHERE: Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer & Anthrax)…seems to me that’d be a gigantic-selling thing, so why has it just been seven shows in Europe so far?

SD: Well, it’s a good question. I mean, we can theorize about why and all that stuff…my theory is, maybe it was just to test the waters, see how everything went, see if it was going to be as successful as everyone hoped it would be. And of course, it was. And we filmed a DVD which will be out November 2nd, The Big Four DVD. And once we did that in Europe, now everyone around the world’s screaming for it. So hopefully we’ll be able to do it next year, or whenever that’s gonna be. But right now, we really don’t know, y’know, there’s talk, you hear things, people say things, but until it actually presents itself…we’re all really hopeful that it will. We’ll see what happens with it.


KK: ‘Cause I and a whole lot of people are hoping you’ll bring that show over to the states.

SD: We do too, certainly, the collective is, that this will all continue one day, because it was so successful and such a fun thing to be a part of.
We’ll see what happens, but we remain hopeful.

KK: Cool…I understand you brought out (Megadeth mascot) Vic Rattlehead onstage for a couple shows, is he going to be coming back more often?

SD: We started doing that halfway through the last tour leg we did with Slayer and Testament. We started doing it, and we’ve been doing it every night since. It went over so well, we incorporated it into the show. Yeah, it’s a cool thing, it went over really well with the fans, so we don’t see any reason not to continue it.

KK: Yeah, ‘cause I always thought that Megadeth should do the same thing with Vic that Iron Maiden does with Eddie. Now, I just discovered that you and I were born in the same year, so your influences as a drummer, would they be Thin Lizzy, Black Sabbath, bands like that?

SD: Well, those two, certainly, yeah. Y’know, growing up in the 70’s, I was exposed to a lot of different types of music, the rock stuff, Deep Purple, Rush, Van Halen, Thin Lizzy, all that stuff. But at the same time I was listening to a lot of jazz stuff. A lot of Al Dimeola, Return To Forever, that stuff. There’s so many great drummers in the jazz field. I got absorbed in all that stuff, so it was cool. And when I was growing up, it wasn’t weird to listen to different types of music. Even on radio, you’d hear a Deep Purple song, and then a Fleetwood Mac song, and no one would blink an eye. Now, I don’t know if they even do that on rock radio now…but I was exposed to a lot of different styles of music. But certainly Neil (Peart) from RUSH was one of my main influences, certainly to this day.

KK: Is “Head Crusher” your favorite song to play? ‘Cause you co-wrote that, I understand.

SD: Yeah, I did co-write that song. Certainly, I love playing it, it’s a fun song to play, but I like playing all the songs, to be honest with you.
Like I said before, it’s a challenging set to play, and you really gotta focus on what you’re doing, but that’s part of the fun, and I enjoy doing that. But yeah, “Head Crusher” is one of my favorites and I like playing it.

© 2010 Crypt Magazine. All Rights Reserved.

 
Top